bartok: concerto for orchestra best recording


The Concerto for Orchestra, Sz.

Rarely have I encountered a reading of the First Concerto where, in the first movement especially, the sense of instrumental interplay is so consistently vital...' Read the review, Béla Bartók’s music takes listeners on a journey through folklore and fantasy. This is Bartók in full color. Fischer never vulgarizes, brutalizes or overstates the case and, what is most important, he underlines those quickly flickering, folkish elements in Bartók’s musical language (they are everywhere in evidence) that other, less intuitive conductors barely acknowledge…’, Isabelle Faust vn Florent Boffard, Ewa Kupiec pfs, ‘Here Faust approaches the music from a Bachian axis: her tone is pure, her double-stopping immaculate (and never abrasive) and her sense of timing acute.

The effect can be downright hectic; but it’s a mightily exciting account, which certainly doesn’t rush its fences or sell the score short.

The low brass and timpani are recorded exquisitely, with just the right balance between their boisterous bouncing and the melody in the rest of the orchestra. Then listen to the final seconds of the movement — a perfectly executed little wink. The tritone outbursts are just the right amount of tart.

MA Music, Leisure and Travel The effect can be downright hectic; but it’s a mightily exciting account, which certainly doesn’t rush its fences or sell the score short. In those moments, the notion of a concerto “for orchestra” feels quite fitting, as the whole orchestra seems to pulse as one. To say that, with Kocsis, ‘less is more’ is to suggest executive reticence, which is certainly not the case…this is unquestionably one of the great piano records of the post-war period...' Read the review, Arabella Steinbacher vn Orchestre de la Suisse Romande / Marek Janowski, 'Arabella Steinbacher and Marek Janowski offer us Bartók in 3D, the three dimensions not only spatial but emotional as well.
With staggering playing by the Chicago Symphony and recording that simply doesn't sound its age, this is a magnificent achievement. 1BBC Scottish Symphony OrchestraThomas Dausgaard – ConductorOnyx, CD ONYX4210, Read more classical music reviews or visit The Classic Review Amazon store.

It covers new album reviews by knowledgeable and independent writers, as well as in-depth guides and news. When Bartók slackens the tension and allows lyric reflectiveness to emerge, as in the first movement’s development, this performance is poetic and subtly shaded to a fault; and even though the second and third movements are usually played with a somewhat lighter touch, I found the sheer intensity of Kopatchinskaja and Eötvös’s advocacy compelling…’, Budapest Festival Orchestra / Iván Fischer, ‘As Mandarins go, they don’t come more miraculous than this – a vivid, no-holds-barred performance that henceforth tops my list of current recommendations. The Classic Review was launched in 2018 for classical music lovers around the globe. Dausgaard and co. are the ultimate Bartók apologists here, if such advocacy is still required; they take every gesture and make it into something wonderfully artistic. Ultimately, their approach may be too sugary for some, but this listener happen to love it.

Life is like composing forward, anytime starts a new bagatelle. The first movement is relentless but never tires the ear; the second displays two very different levels of tension, one slow and mysterious, the other hectic but controlled; and although others might have thrown off the finale’s octaves with even greater abandon, Anda’s performance is the most successful in suggesting savage aggression barely held in check…’, ‘Kocsis’s mastery of tone, rhythm and articulation, allied to his painstaking attention to important source material (namely Bartók’s scores and records), make for a level of pianistic distinction that is fairly unique in this repertory.

Review: Martinů – Violin Concertos – Frank Peter Zimmermann, Bamberger Symphoniker, Jakub Hruša, Review: “Amici e Rivali” – Lawrence Brownlee and Michael Spyres perform Rossini, Double Review: Quatuor Arod and the Signum Quartett Play Schubert, Review: “Carnival of the Animals” – The Kanneh-Masons, Review: Louis Lortie Plays Chopin, Volume 6, Review: “1939” – Violin Concertos By Walton, Hartmann, Bartók – Fabiola Kim, Violin, Review: Bartók – Strings Quartets (Complete) – Quatuor Diotima, Review: Janáček and Ligeti String Quartets – Belcea Quartet, Review: Ravel – Piano Concerto, Le Tombeau de Couperin – Perianes, Pons, Review: Bach – Motets – Ensemble Pygmalion, Raphaël Pichon, Review: “Anima Rara” – Ermonela Jaho, Soprano, Review: “Aranjuez” – Thibaut Garcia, Guitar, Review: Haydn – String Quartets Op. With staggering playing by the Chicago Symphony and recording that simply doesn’t sound its age, this is a magnificent achievement. DG’s close brightly-lit, yet never oppressive recording quality must share some of the credit for that, of course. 1, a piece from the young Bartók’s pen, and the Concerto for Orchestra, one of the final orchestral works he completed. Chicago Symphony Orchestra / Fritz Reiner. I lost count of the number of times I paused the CD player to note this or that salient detail…’, Jean-Efflam Bavouzet pf BBC Philharmonic Orchestra / Gianandrea Noseda, ‘If you’re after a disc of Bartók’s piano concertos that maximises on the music’s drive, elegance and sparring potential, then you could hardly do better than this ear-catching new production by Jean-Efflam Bavouzet and the BBC Philharmonic under the spirited direction of Gianandrea Noseda. Nimsgern is a tortured, yet commanding Bluebeard, vocally excellent and interpretatively compelling, although the recording does sometimes lend his voice an untypically cavernous quality…’, Géza Anda pf Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra / Ferenc Fricsay, ‘Much as one would like to tout the new as the best, there are some older recordings where a very special chemistry spells ‘definitive’, and that pose an almost impossible challenge to subsequent rivals. Chicago Symphony Orchestra / Fritz Reiner, ‘A classic recording by one of the master Bartók conductors. CLASSICALDAILY 2020 © COPYRIGHT ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, Gramophone: Monteverdi’s Combattimento – which recording should you buy? In the second movement, the ensemble playing shines; the strings and winds sing in gorgeous octaves, and pizzicatos which rarely sound so foreboding.

String Quartets.



Read our Best Of guides for classical music. Nimsgern is a tortured, yet commanding Bluebeard, vocally excellent and interpretatively compelling, although the recording does sometimes lend his voice an untypically cavernous quality...' Read the review, Géza Anda pf Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra / Ferenc Fricsay, 'Much as one would like to tout the new as the best, there are some older recordings where a very special chemistry spells 'definitive', and that pose an almost impossible challenge to subsequent rivals. DG's close brightly-lit, yet never oppressive recording quality must share some of the credit for that, of course.

Combine this with controlled vehemence, headlong velocity and razor-sharp unanimity (any fast movement from quartets two to five can serve as illustration) and you have a formidable alliance of virtues...' Read the review, Patricia Kopatchinskaja vn Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra / Peter Eötvös, 'Bartók’s Second Violin Concerto has long since been accorded classic status and in – my guess – making a determined effort to ‘think it new’, Kopatchinskaja and Eötvös sometimes risk exaggerating what is already pretty intense. Rarely have I encountered a reading of the First Concerto where, in the first movement especially, the sense of instrumental interplay is so consistently vital…’, Béla Bartók’s music takes listeners on a journey through folklore and fantasy. This album holds its own against any you care to compare it to — Reiner, Solti, Dorati, Kocsis, or more recently, Alsop or Eschenbach. Highly recommended for all. Rob Cowan offers a guide to exploring his compelling genius…, Rob Cowan talks to violinist James Ehnes about the demands of Bartók’s Solo Violin Sonata…, Tackling Bartók’s three piano concertos is tantamount to conquering Mount Everest – but is the view from the summit worth the climb, asks Geoffrey Norris…. All the different gestures — the accelerandos and allargandos, the sharp pizzicatos, the tasty brass morsels — risk turning the piece into a hodgepodge in unskilled hands. The Concerto for Orchestra has proven to be Bartok's most popular work, due in large part to the directness of its language.

The contrast between these two pieces is indeed stark, but Dausgaard and the …
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